Top Performing Cattle Entries Honored As Climax Of Flint Hills Beef Fest

Highlight of the 32nd annual Flint Hills Beef Fest at Emporia was recognition of top entries in the grass futurity and live stocker show competitions.

Mike and Gary Meats of  G&J Meats at LeRoy accepted the grand award in the steer division of cattle competitions featured at the Flint Hills Beef Fest in Emporia.

Joan Olson, center, president-elect of the Flint Hills Beef Fest, presented the top place grass futurity award for heifers to Tim and Kristie Arndt of A&A Cattle of Emporia highlighting the Flint Hills Beef Fest at Emporia.

With all of the additional features of the weekend celebration, festivities still highlight the grass cattle industry for which grazing in the Flint Hills is known, according to Scott Jones, president of the 2018 Flint Hills Beef Fest.

Greg Akagi, longtime 580 WIBW farm editor, announced the winners, and Joan Olson, president-elect of the Flint Hills Beef Fest, presented awards.

There were 37 pens of steers and 33 pens of heifers weighed April 30, 2018, for grazing competition at the Highland Ranch near Olpe.

A total of 208 cattle were gathered August 16, and weighed at Emporia Livestock Sales, where the live stocker show was August 18.

Average daily gain for the 112 steers in the contest was 1.618 pounds per day, while the 99 heifers gained 1.718 pounds a day.

Gary and Judy Meats of G&G Meats of LeRoy won the grand award in the steer division. Their Pen-54 steers topped the grass futurity gaining 2.507 pounds a day and also placed first in the live stocker show.

Jason and Justin Loomis of the Loomis Ranch at Council Grove took home the grand award in the heifer division. Their Pen-23 heifers topped the live stocker show and placed second in the grass futurity gaining 2.352 pounds per day.

Tim and Kristie Arndt of A&A Cattle at Emporia had the top grass futurity heifers gaining 2.434 pounds per day

Second through fifth in the steer grass futurity were Meats Farms, LeRoy, 2.071 pounds; Matt and Stacie Horton, Council Grove, 2.069 pounds; Wes Cahoone and Lee Glanville, Cottonwood Falls, 1.991 pounds, and Anderson Ranch, Alma, 1.979 pounds.

Placing third through fifth in the heifer grass futurity were Haun Ranch, Fall River, 2.282 pounds; Spring Creek Ranch, Cassoday, 2.191 pounds; and Wittker Farms, Strong City, 2.117 pounds.

Justin and Jason Loomis of the Loomis Ranch at Council Grove accepted the grand award in the heifer division of cattle competitions featured at the Flint Hills Beef Fest in Emporia.

Live stocker show placings second through fifth for steers included Darbyshire Farms, Hartford; Arndt Farms, Emporia; FJ Redeker and Son, Olpe; and Leffler Farms, Americus.

Ranking second through fifth in the live stocker show for heifers were Loomis Ranch, Pen-22; Spring Creek Ranch; Burton and Potter, Emporia; and Arndt Farms.

In the grandstand judging competition, Donna Bates, Galesburg, and Derek Sawyer of McPherson tied for first place in the steer division. Mark Anderson, Alma, was first in the heifer judging contest.

Wes Cahoone, Cottonwood Falls, won the heifer weight guessing contest, and Jim Bates, Galesburg, topped the steer weight guessing competition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wheat Code Finally Cracked

Kansas State University scientists, in collaboration with the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, published a detailed description of the complete genome of bread wheat, the world’s most widely-cultivated crop (a highly complex and elusive genome). This work will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability.

WIBW Radio/KAN Podcast: Justin Gilpin, CEO of Kansas Wheat

 

Justin Gilpin, CEO of Kansas Wheat joined us on Tuesday’s Ag Issues program. Gilpin discussed last week’s announcement of the complete genome for bread wheat and the work that has been done that will pave the way for the production of wheat varieties better adapted to climate challenges, with higher yields, enhanced nutritional quality and improved sustainability. He also talked about winter wheat harvest wrapping in Montana and the pacific northwest. Gilpin also discussed the global supply and demand situation in wheat especially with production issues in Europe and Russia. He also talked about Iraq and with their short crop that they are coming back into the export market.  He ended the program by talking about the planting conditions for the upcoming planting season and the prospects of the size of the crop for 2019.

 

 

(Photo Courtesy of Kansas State University)

WIBW Radio/KAN Podcast: American Farm Bureau Federation’s Dale Moore

 

Dale Moore, Vice President of Public Affairs with the American Farm Bureau Federation joined us on Monday’s Ag Issues program. Moore commented on the action by a South Carolina district court judge, this past week, that overturns the Trump Administration’s attempt to delay the implementation of the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rules.  He also commented on the latest news concerning trade, both on the NAFTA renegotiations, China and other countries. Moore also looked how the negotiations in the farm bill conference committee will play out the next several weeks.

 

Cattle in Drought Impacted Flint Hills Area…Sporadic Results

Brody Peak, with Emporia Livestock Sales Company, joined Greg Akagi on Friday morning’s Ag Issues program on 580 WIBW.  The interview was part of a live broadcast from the Flint Hills Beef Fest in Emporia, and 580 WIBW’s Beef Producers Information Seminar which took place Friday morning.  Peak spoke about how cattle in the Flint Hills area have been affected by the drought conditions this year.  He also talked about the Flint Hills Beef Fest.

 

Cordial Young Cowboy Rides Quarter Horse Mare To World Show Accolades

“Thank you Sir.” That always naturally congenial acknowledgement is ample verification of a young cowboy’s future successes.

Eager to talk about horses, riding and showing, most polite Ransom Tiffany, just 11-years-old, already has highly notable horseback achievements.

The Council Grove cowboy was in the Top 15 at the recent American Quarter Horse Youth Association World Championship in Oklahoma City.

Ransom rode his 2009 Quarter Horse mare Country Bay Whiz to high ranking in the Level 3, 13-and-under ranch riding class.

“There were 42 exhibitors, so I felt good since it’s my first year at such a large show,” he admitted.

Shawn and Nicky Tiffany verified: “We are proud parents for sure.”

Additionally special, Mom Nicky recognized, “Ransom has trained the mare called Sage for the past year-and-a-half primarily on his own.”

“Sage is a great horse, but I try to ride nearly every day to keep improving,” Ransom said.

The proud, happy family of Shawn and Nicky Tiffany along with friends gathered when Ransom Tiffany, 11, Council Grove, posed Country Bay Whiz for a Top 15 portrait at the recent American Quarter Horse Youth Association World Championship in Oklahoma City.

Two weeks before the world show, Ransom had Sage at his grandparents’ place near Lindsey, Oklahoma. “That helped me get myself and my horse focused for the competition,” he admitted.

“All of my family have really been a great help in everything I’d done with my horses,” the young cowboy credited.

Ranch riding class features a pattern to walk, jog and lope maneuvers as if working on a ranch. “The course is often set with cattle nearby like on a ranch to see how the horse performs,” Ransom said.

Noteworthy, the Level-3 division is the competition above beginner riders, although Ransom was just in his first year there. “This was the inaugural 13-and-under division, with Ransom making history as a Kansas representative,” Nicky noted.

Ransom also competed in the Level-2 ranch riding and Level-2-and-3 reining classes, both 18-and-under divisions. “The leveling system is still confusing to many, including myself,” Nicky pointed out.

Ransom Tiffany, 11, Council Grove, showed his 2009 Quarter Horse mare Country Bay Whiz called Sage at the recent American Quarter Horse Youth Association World Championship in Oklahoma City. They were Top 15 out of 42 entries in the Level 3, 13-and-under ranch riding class.

To be eligible for the prestigious world competition, Ransom had to have sufficient qualifying points at registered Quarter Horse shows. “All of my points came from riding at the Kansas Quarter Horses Association shows in Hutchinson,” he noted.

Showing and winning are not new for the cowboy. “I’ve been competing in the South Central Stock Horse Association and have three yearend highpoint buckles,” Ransom commented.

He collected a number of awards at his hometown Morris County Fair and the District 4-H Horse Show in Salina.

“That qualifies me to show at the Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson,” Ransom said. For that show, he’ll be riding another family horse, the red roan gelding called Skip.

Horses are a family affair including his parents and his sisters, Taylor, eight; Ainsley, seven; and Whitney, five.

“Of course, their little brother, Stockton, three, joins us in all of our ‘horsey’ activities,” Mom added.

“We all ride and help each other,” Ransom asserted. While there’s certain sharing of mounts, typically four horses are saddled for a family horseback workout.

Each horse has an individual stall with exercise runs making ample daily chores. “We all share the work feeding and caring for our horses as well as the daily stall cleaning,” Ransom insisted.

Too young for set career plans, Ransom said, “I’ll always be a horseman and work with horses my entire life.

“Thank you Sir,” he respectfully concluded.

The world show had more than 3,500 youth18-and-under entries from throughout the United States and four other countries.

Climatologist: Recent Rains Helpful for Northeast Kansas, But Still Need More!

Climatologist Mary Knapp with KSU’s Department of Agronomy, Weather Data Library was the guest on Thursday’s Ag Issues program on 580 WIBW.  Knapp talked about which areas of Kansas benefited, and which areas were still way behind on precipitation this year.  Knapp discussed both positive and possible negative impacts of the recent rains.  She also talked about how Monsoon season in Arizona and a developing El Nino could affect Kansas weather.