Bee informed about bee health

Beekeepers across the United States lost 44 percent of their honey bee colonies during the year spanning April 2015 to April 2016, according to an annual nationwide survey of commercial and small-scale beekeepers. The survey found that summer losses – when bees are at their healthiest – rivaled winter loss rates.

Kansas Farmers Awarded $218 million in Syngenta Lawsuit

 

A federal jury in Kansas has awarded nearly $218 million to farmers who sued
Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically
engineered corn seed variety.

Friday’s verdict after a three-week trial in Kansas City, Kansas, involves four
Kansas farmers representing more than 7,000 farmers in the state. Another trial
involving about 60,000 cases begins next month in Minnesota.

The lawsuits allege Syngenta introduced the seed variety to the U.S. market
before China approved it for imports, wrecking an increasingly important export
market for U.S. corn and causing price drops.

The Kansas trial was the first test case. It and the Minnesota trial will
provide guidance for how the complex web of litigation in state and federal
courts could be resolved.

Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta says it will appeal a Kansas federal jury’s awarding of nearly $218 million to Kansas farmers who sued the company over its introduction of a genetically modified corn seed variety.

USDA Halts Imports of Fresh Brazilian Beef

The U.S. Department of Agriculture Thursday evening announced that it would halt imports of fresh Brazilian beef. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue in a statement said: “Ensuring the safety of our nation’s food supply is one of our critical missions, and it’s one we undertake with great seriousness,” in making the announcement. The suspension of shipments will remain in place until the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture takes corrective action which USDA finds satisfactory.

Since March, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service has been inspecting 100 percent of all meat products arriving in the United States from Brazil. FSIS has refused entry to 11 percent of Brazilian fresh beef products. That figure is substantially higher than the rejection rate of one percent of shipments from the rest of the world. Brazil’s meat industry has been in turmoil this year since the investigation of a corruption scheme that allowed tainted meat to pass in-country inspections.

 

Kansas Wheat Harvest Report June 22

This is day 9 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Farmers near Radium, in Stafford County, are taking their combine passes in the fields slowly as they cut through dense, tough and abundant straw. Yields in the area are expected to be higher than average, but some fields planted earlier last fall did see substantial freeze damage. Large mud holes can be see in many fields, a sight that hasn’t been seen to this extent in years, but something that will ultimately hurt final yields. Proteins in the area have averaged around 11 percent. 

Ford County, Kansas has been lucky to start harvest says Jerald Kemmerer, CEO of Pride Ag Resources, LLC. Rain has been in the forecast almost every night and has been slowing down farmers. He reported that farmers have been in the field for a little over a week and are cutting like mad trying to get their fields done before yet another rain hits. Farmers have taken little over 10 percent of expected wheat bushels to the elevator. 

“We have been dodging weather here,” he says. 

Unfortunately the area was hit with some hail last week, but not too much damage was done, he says. 
Average test weights in the area have hovered around 60 pounds per bushel and protein content is variable, but lower than average. 

“It’s better than we thought it would be with all the wheat streak mosaic and leaf and stripe rusts  going on this year,” says Kemmerer. “The wheat with the disease has been ranging from 30 through 40 bushels per acre for yields.” 

Doug Keesling, a farmer from Rice County says he has been in the field for a week and has been averaging 60 bushels per acre. Even in the hot and windy weather, his test weights have been between 62 and 64 and his protein is ranging from 8.8 to 12.7 percent. 

Keesling says his crops this year have been similar to last year, but his yields may be down slightly. 

The 2017 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. For exclusive #wheatharvest17 content, please head to facebook.com/kansaswheat.

Kansas Wheat Harvest Report June 21

 

This is day 8 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

While farmers in central Kansas may be celebrating good harvesting conditions and above average yields, farmers to the west are starting to cope with shattered harvest plans and wheat heads after a storm hurled up to softball sized hail on Tuesday night.

Sources near Deerfield reported that their wheat is “toast,” but not the kind farmers want to see. Severe damage to crops, vehicles and homes were common place from Garden City to Ulysses, but 130 miles east farmers like Randy Fritzemeier, Stafford, saw ideal harvesting conditions and decent yields.

Fritzemeier reported that yields in his area have ranged from 30-80 bushels per acre. He started cutting his wheat about 10 days ago and will be wrapping up in another five days. Fritzemeier didn’t have any protein levels for his fields but a fellow farmer in the area said his protein was 11.1%. Test weights remained above 60 pounds per bushel.

Jenny Burgess, who farms in the Sterling area, reported that her yields have averaged 64 bushels per acre. She reported that their test weights remained very good and they received ample rain during grain fill. Burgess predicted they will be harvesting for a few more days, if the weather cooperates.

The 2017 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. For exclusive #wheatharvest17 content, please head to facebook.com/kansaswheat.

KDA Seeks Volunteers for Emergency Response Corps

Davis Hogg, Assistant Emergency Management Coordinator for the Kansas Department of Agriculture, outlined an effort by KDA to establish the Kansas Agriculture Emergency Response Corps (KAERC).  The Corps will be made up of volunteers who will be trained to be prepared to respond to an agricultural emergency.  Kansas would be the first state in the nation to establish such a program.

 

Kansas Wheat Harvest Report June 20

 

This is day 7 of the Kansas Wheat Harvest Reports, brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association.

Combines are rolling on across Kansas as harvest slowly starts to inch north and west.

David Radenberg, a farmer near Claflin, reported that while he is around 50 percent done with his harvest, the average completion for the area is a little lower. Yields for the Radenbergs are ranging from 35-55 bushels per acre and test weights are remaining ‘excellent’ with an average above 60 pounds per bushel.

“I fertilized some with chicken manure,” said Radenberg. “The spots I did that in ended up yielding around 10 bushels an acre more, and that’s something that I was really impressed with.”

Kevin Kelly, manager of the Twin Rivers Coop in Arkansas City, reported that the area is 95 percent done with a ‘disappointing harvest.’

“This year we’re going to be about 55 percent of the five year average,” said Kelly. “The decline is due to average yields and acres going to fall crops.”

Kelly said that the average range for the area will be around 35-38 bushels per acre and test weights have ranged from 58-62 pounds per bushel.

“A lot of wheat was drowned out on our flat grounds,” said Kelly. “Farmers came in and said while they were cutting that one side of the field would make 20 bushels an acre while the other side would make 80.”

Disease pressure in the area was minimal during the growing season. The proteins in the area will be below average. Kelly predicts that harvest will be completely wrapped up by the end of the week.

Nicole Harrison of Rezac Land and Livestock in Pottawatomie County, reports that their harvest got rolling last Thursday, June 15. Their fields have averaged 64 bushels per acre, with 13.8% moisture. She reports that harvest is going well and says, “We never really saw much disease in it.” They will be cutting for at least another three days.

The 2017 Harvest Report is brought to you by the Kansas Wheat Commission, Kansas Association of Wheat Growers and the Kansas Grain and Feed Association. For exclusive #wheatharvest17 content, please head to facebook.com/kansaswheat.